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Interview

November 24, 2020

A Day in The Life with BTS Photographer Martin Wyall

Interview by
Joel Fuller

Interview

November 24, 2020

A Day in The Life with BTS Photographer Martin Wyall

Interview by
Joel Fuller

Martin Wyall is a 24 year old adventure photographer based in Utah. We chatted with him about his experience being the BTS photographer for The Automotive Photography Workshop with Aaron Brimhall, the importance of networking, and where he sees his photography going forward.

Okay first off, explain what was going through your mind taking this photo ↑. Were you nervous?

Nervous? To be honest no. Aaron earlier in the day told the driver to get as close to him as possible and that it’s his job to get out of the way. So I wasn’t worried. You can tell it wasn’t Aaron’s first time doing this, he’s super calculated with everything he does.  At that moment the truck was doing donut after donut and for a moment I definitely thought there was no way Aaron and these guys weren't going to get hit. It’s crazy how close Aaron is able to comfortably get. He would move in and out, almost like a dance performance with the moving truck. Obviously you need to be very careful, but I wasn’t at all nervous for Aaron.

What was the day like shooting BTS for the field episode?

It was amazing. We met up in the morning for breakfast in Salt Lake and then all drove out to this incredible spot in the desert. Aaron is a super kind and outgoing guy and everyone on set that day was really great to work with, super chill and professional. I absolutely love being a fly on the wall and documenting days like this.


Were there any specific shots you needed to get? 

No not really, the whole day was pretty chill and candid. I had a couple moments where I got to take Aaron aside without the camera crew to get shots of just him in his element. The whole day I was using what I learned from Alex Strohl’s Adventure Pro and Finn Beale’s Storytelling Workshops. I have definitely learned a lot from Wildist workshops and Finn’s tips in the field regarding how to shoot a variety of different shots has been hugely valuable to me. I fall back on these tips often.


How did you get contacted to shoot BTS for this? 

Last year late summer, I did a summer photo retreat in Montana with Alex Strohl. During the retreat I spent some time with Graham, Alex’s studio manager. Graham knew I lived in Utah and reached out to see if I’d like to shoot  BTS for a new workshop being filmed. I was totally in. I was only there for the field day, but it was amazing. Aaron is so dope, a really fun character, and Graham always keeps the party rolling. 

Has growing your network been an important part of your photography journey? 

Growing my network is something that I have only recently learned to be vital. I’m an introverted person. I don’t like big crowds, talking to people, and to be honest if I could just be in the wild by myself for the rest of my life I would be happy and fulfilled. But that’s totally unrealistic for getting new work and opportunities. Attending that workshop in Montana and meeting Graham was the only way I got to do this. Without meeting him I would have never been asked to help take these BTS shots. There’s so many good photographers here in Utah that Wildist could’ve reached out to.


Did you learn some things from Aaron that day shooting BTS?

Yes absolutely. One of the main things I picked up from Aaron is how slow he is with the process of shooting. A lot of his photos are fast paced and make you immediately want to dive into the action, don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot of action, but he takes his time. Taking multiple shots, being very precise with his angles, and getting the shot exactly how he wants it before moving on. That was the biggest thing that stood out to me. It doesn’t seem like that’s the case when you look at his work. I’ve found one of the biggest indicators of a really good photographer is when their work looks off the cuff, super simple, easy, like they sped through it, but when you’re there, seeing them work, they’re taking their time getting the shots and being very precise. That’s the mark of a pro. He was so meticulous about getting the angles taking the idea of being a perfectionist to a whole new level. Seeing him describe how to do that, how he approaches it all, all of it was so insightful for me.


Moving forward, where do you see yourself taking your adventure photography?

I know what niche I want to go after now and it’s aviation. I feel like there aren't a lot of people shooting in that space compared to other things and I absolutely love it. Anything with airplanes, bush planes, paragliding, and speedflying. Winter is coming up and I really wanna get some photos of people paragliding with skis. The end goal is to build a really great portfolio around these interests. Just like anything else, I'm sure things will probably change down the road, but this is the path I want to take.


You can check out Martin’s work here.

Martin Wyall is a 24 year old adventure photographer based in Utah. We chatted with him about his experience being the BTS photographer for The Automotive Photography Workshop with Aaron Brimhall, the importance of networking, and where he sees his photography going forward.

Okay first off, explain what was going through your mind taking this photo ↑. Were you nervous?

Nervous? To be honest no. Aaron earlier in the day told the driver to get as close to him as possible and that it’s his job to get out of the way. So I wasn’t worried. You can tell it wasn’t Aaron’s first time doing this, he’s super calculated with everything he does.  At that moment the truck was doing donut after donut and for a moment I definitely thought there was no way Aaron and these guys weren't going to get hit. It’s crazy how close Aaron is able to comfortably get. He would move in and out, almost like a dance performance with the moving truck. Obviously you need to be very careful, but I wasn’t at all nervous for Aaron.

What was the day like shooting BTS for the field episode?

It was amazing. We met up in the morning for breakfast in Salt Lake and then all drove out to this incredible spot in the desert. Aaron is a super kind and outgoing guy and everyone on set that day was really great to work with, super chill and professional. I absolutely love being a fly on the wall and documenting days like this.


Were there any specific shots you needed to get? 

No not really, the whole day was pretty chill and candid. I had a couple moments where I got to take Aaron aside without the camera crew to get shots of just him in his element. The whole day I was using what I learned from Alex Strohl’s Adventure Pro and Finn Beale’s Storytelling Workshops. I have definitely learned a lot from Wildist workshops and Finn’s tips in the field regarding how to shoot a variety of different shots has been hugely valuable to me. I fall back on these tips often.


How did you get contacted to shoot BTS for this? 

Last year late summer, I did a summer photo retreat in Montana with Alex Strohl. During the retreat I spent some time with Graham, Alex’s studio manager. Graham knew I lived in Utah and reached out to see if I’d like to shoot  BTS for a new workshop being filmed. I was totally in. I was only there for the field day, but it was amazing. Aaron is so dope, a really fun character, and Graham always keeps the party rolling. 

Has growing your network been an important part of your photography journey? 

Growing my network is something that I have only recently learned to be vital. I’m an introverted person. I don’t like big crowds, talking to people, and to be honest if I could just be in the wild by myself for the rest of my life I would be happy and fulfilled. But that’s totally unrealistic for getting new work and opportunities. Attending that workshop in Montana and meeting Graham was the only way I got to do this. Without meeting him I would have never been asked to help take these BTS shots. There’s so many good photographers here in Utah that Wildist could’ve reached out to.


Did you learn some things from Aaron that day shooting BTS?

Yes absolutely. One of the main things I picked up from Aaron is how slow he is with the process of shooting. A lot of his photos are fast paced and make you immediately want to dive into the action, don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot of action, but he takes his time. Taking multiple shots, being very precise with his angles, and getting the shot exactly how he wants it before moving on. That was the biggest thing that stood out to me. It doesn’t seem like that’s the case when you look at his work. I’ve found one of the biggest indicators of a really good photographer is when their work looks off the cuff, super simple, easy, like they sped through it, but when you’re there, seeing them work, they’re taking their time getting the shots and being very precise. That’s the mark of a pro. He was so meticulous about getting the angles taking the idea of being a perfectionist to a whole new level. Seeing him describe how to do that, how he approaches it all, all of it was so insightful for me.


Moving forward, where do you see yourself taking your adventure photography?

I know what niche I want to go after now and it’s aviation. I feel like there aren't a lot of people shooting in that space compared to other things and I absolutely love it. Anything with airplanes, bush planes, paragliding, and speedflying. Winter is coming up and I really wanna get some photos of people paragliding with skis. The end goal is to build a really great portfolio around these interests. Just like anything else, I'm sure things will probably change down the road, but this is the path I want to take.


You can check out Martin’s work here.

The Automotive Photography Workshop

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